Memory

Too Little Sleep Harms Cognition. So Does Too Much.

Too Little Sleep Harms Cognition — and So Does Too Much

In recent years there is a growing amount of evidence showing a direct negative impact between diminished sleep and a variety of complaints, including cognitive function. Recently researchers from Western University’s Brain and Mind Institute in Canada set up the largest sleep study ever conducted, examining data from 40,000 people. Dr. Adrian Owen, a cognitive…

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A Few Minutes of Light Exercise Can Improve Brain Function

A Few Minutes of Light Exercise Can Improve Brain Function

As we age, many of us experience increasing aches and pains, especially in the morning or on cold or rainy days. We also face a greater likelihood of developing diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and arthritis, just to name a few. However, one of the most difficult issues for most seniors to deal with…

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Seasonal Changes and Dementia

Seasonal Changes and Dementia

Seasonal changes have been linked with a number of illnesses. For example, Seasonal Affective Disorder, also known as SAD, is a type of depression that occurs during the winter months, when people’s exposure to the sun is limited due to the shorter days. It has also been shown that the onset of schizophrenia is most…

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DICE Method Effective for Alzheimer’s

DICE Method Effective for Alzheimer’s

Agitation, aggression, and other difficult behaviors are common in people with Alzheimer’s disease. Often, these behaviors are managed with antipsychotic and other psychiatric drugs. However, while a pharmacological approach may be simple to implement, it is not necessarily in the best interest of the patient. A paper in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society…

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The Impact of Seeing and Hearing on Cognitive Decline

Staying socially active is good for the brain. And being able to see and hear help facilitate being socially active. So, is being able to see and hear good for the brain? The answer to that is yes. Remarkable new research shows that hearing aids and cataract surgery, which improve hearing and vision, are actually…

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Screening for Alzheimer’s — with an Eye Exam?!

The eyes have long been known as windows to the soul; new research shows they may be windows to the brain, particularly the Alzheimer’s brain, as well. Today, testing for Alzheimer’s relies on a clinical exam of mental ability; only postmortem examination can conclusively diagnose the presence of Alzheimer’s Disease. Moreover, clinical exams of mental…

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The Surprising Brain Benefits of Exercise for Seniors

Doing the daily crossword puzzle to stave off those “senior moments” when the right word is just out of reach? That’s good, but a recent study published in Scientific Reports indicates that taking a brisk walk can help just as much. The study confirmed what we all know — that as we get older, we…

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6 Things to Pack When Traveling with Alzheimer’s

Dad has Alzheimer’s, but you know he’d love a trip to visit family. You’ve planned the travel perfectly: the destination is no more than four hours away, you are traveling during his best hours of the day, and your itinerary allows for plenty of rest time. Now it’s time to pack. Here are the 6…

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4 Types of Medication Seniors Should Avoid

As we age, the worry that crops up most commonly concerns cognitive function, especially memory. While other chronic conditions, such as heart disease and diabetes, might be more common, nothing strikes at the heart of who we are than our ability to think and to remember. We may joke about “senior moments,” but our fear…

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New Alzheimer’s Diagnosis Guidelines Released

The Alzheimer’s Association has just released twenty recommendations for best practices in diagnosing Alzheimer’s Disease and Related Dementias (ADRD). The recommendations were reported at the 2018 Alzheimer’s Association International Conference, held this week in Chicago. The most crucial aspects of the recommendations include the admonition not to dismiss concerns as “normal aging,” but to evaluate…

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